Home Reading Review: The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

Review: The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon

by Kristeena
Review: The Sun Is Also a Star by Nicola YoonThe Sun is Also a Star by Nicola Yoon
Published by Delacorte Press on November 1st 2016
Genre: Young Adult
Format: Hardcover
Pages: 348
Challenge Theme: A young adult book


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Synopsis:
Natasha: I’m a girl who believes in science and facts. Not fate. Not destiny. Or dreams that will never come true. I’m definitely not the kind of girl who meets a cute boy on a crowded New York City street and falls in love with him. Not when my family is twelve hours away from being deported to Jamaica. Falling in love with him won’t be my story.

Daniel: I’ve always been the good son, the good student, living up to my parents’ high expectations. Never the poet. Or the dreamer. But when I see her, I forget about all that. Something about Natasha makes me think that fate has something much more extraordinary in store—for both of us.

The Universe: Every moment in our lives has brought us to this single moment. A million futures lie before us. Which one will come true?

Review:
I really, really enjoyed this book (if you can’t tell by the amount of quotes I included.) I have read a lot of the reviews on Goodreads and most of the people who didn’t like it gave reasons that made me love the book. I loved that the entire book takes place over one day, I love the “insta-love” between Natasha and Daniel, I love that there are sub-chapters of characters that aren’t really a fixture in the book but give details important to the story. The dual perspective seems to be a popular tool in a lot of books today and I really enjoy that.

The idea that one small choice can change the course of your life is such an interesting concept and this book shows that in such a great way. Is it fate or just dumb luck? What would our lives be like if we made a different choice? Such a crazy thing to think about.

***SPOILER ALERT***

I was so afraid I would hate the ending of this book, and for a little bit I wasn’t liking where it was going, but at the end I was very happy with how the author decided to end the book. I love how she brought the character of Irene back into the mix and love how she brought Natasha and Daniel back together as adults to show that their teenage romance was in fact the real thing.

Favorite Quotes:
“She looks up from her broken headphones. As our eyes meet, I get a kind of deja vu, but instead of feeling like I’m repeating something in the past, it feels like I’m experiencing something that will happen in my future. I see us in old age. I can’t see our faces; I don’t know where are even when we are. But I have a strange and happy feeling that I can’t quite describe. It’s like knowing all the words to a song but still finding them beautiful and surprising.”

“There’s a Japanese phrase that I like: koi no yokan. It doesn’t mean love at first sight. It’s closer to love at second sight. It’s the feeling when you meet someone that you’re going to fall in love with them. Maybe you don’t love them right away, but it’s inevitable that you will.”

“We have big, beautiful brains. We invent things that fly. Fly. We write poetry. You probably hate poetry, but it’s hard to argue with ‘Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate’ in terms of sheer beauty. We are capable of big lives. A big history. Why settle? Why choose the practical thing, the mundane thing? We are born to dream and make the things we dream about.”

“Maybe part of falling in love with someone else is also falling in love with yourself.”

“I think all the good parts of us are connected on some level. The part that shares the last double chocolate chip cookie or donates to charity or gives a dollar to a street musician or becomes a candy striper or cries at Apple commercials or says I love you or I forgive you. I think that’s God. God is the connection of the very best parts of us.”

“Still, getting over him didn’t take that long at all. And that’s the thing that makes me wary. Where did all those feelings go? People spend their whole lives looking for love. Poems and songs and entire novels are written about it. But how can you trust something that can end as suddenly as it begins?”

“People just want to believe. Otherwise they would have to admit that life is just a random series of good and bad things that happen until one day you die.”

“I love this part of getting to know someone. How every new piece of information, every new expression, seems magical. I can’t imagine this becoming old and boring. I can’t imagine not wanting to hear what she has to say.”

“We think we want all the time in the world with the people we love, but maybe what we need is the opposite. Just a finite amount of time, so we still think the other person is interesting. Maybe we don’t need acts two and three. Maybe love is best in act one.”

“People make mistakes all the time. Small ones, like you get in the wrong checkout line. The one with the lady with a hundred coupons and a checkbook.
Sometimes you make medium-sized ones. You go to medical school instead of pursuing you passion.
Sometimes you make big ones.
You give up.”

“When they say the heart wants what it wants, they’re talking about the poetic heart—the heart of love songs and soliloquies, the one that can break as if it were just-formed glass. They’re not talking about the real heart, the one that only needs healthy foods and aerobic exercise. But the poetic heart is not to be trusted. It is fickle and will lead you astray. It will tell you that all you need is love and dreams. It will say nothing about food and water and shelter and money. It will tell you that this person, the one in front of you, the one who caught your eye for whatever reason, is the One. And he is. And she is. The One—for right now, until his heart or her heart decides on someone else or something else. The poetic heart is not to be trusted with long-term decision-making.”

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